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Care & Wellness

  • Having your dog accompany you during travel may add enjoyment to your trip. It is important to keep your dog's safety in mind when traveling, so be sure to check with the airline well in advance of your trip. For pets that are too large to travel in the cabin, you have two options: checked luggage or manifest cargo. Take direct flights whenever possible and try to avoid connections and layovers. Have your dog examined by your veterinarian in advance of the trip. Flight requirements may include written proof of certain vaccinations, blood tests, or anti-parasitic treatment that has been performed within a specified time period. Your dog's travel carrier will be its home for much of your trip, so it is important to choose the right carrier. By applying a few common sense rules, you can keep your traveling dog safe and sound.

  • These large working dogs were originally bred to hunt ferocious prey animals such as bears and boars, and to defend their master's property. They are docile most of the time, good-natured, with courage, alertness and dignity. They are extremely loyal companions. However, Akitas are also stubborn, self-willed, and aloof when first introduced to strangers.

  • The Alaskan Malamute is the largest of all sled dogs, and has a somewhat wolf-like appearance. Friendly and outgoing with a distinct independent streak, the Malamute is a great companion and, like most working breeds, thrives when given a job to do.

  • Descendants of English Foxhounds brought to the US in the 17th century by George Washington and several of his contemporaries, American English Coonhounds were bred to handle North America's rougher terrain. A dual-purpose dog, they were employed to hunt fox during the day and raccoons at night, using their endless energy and enthusiastic bawl.

  • The American Eskimo Dog (Eskie to his friends) comes in the largest size range of any of the spitz dogs, from six-pound toy to 40-pound standard. Fun-loving and smart, this is one of the most companionable of spitz breeds.

  • The American Foxhound is a gentle, loving breed that does well in packs. If one dog is your limit, the humans in the family will have to be the pack. In other words, this breed does not do well isolated in the back yard, but must be part of a group. Several strains exist today, most kept by dedicated hunters.

  • The American Staffordshire Terrier, like the other bull terrier breeds, has a reputation as a fighting dog. But with the exception of those that have been poorly socialized or trained to fight, the American Staffordshire Terrier is a fine, affectionate canine companion who has been unfairly targeted by legislation aimed at outlawing the breed.

  • Energetic and playful, the American Water Spaniel loves kids and makes a great companion for active people. They enjoy investigating, running, hunting, fetching, and swimming. This sporting breed likes to keep moving and needs lots of exercise, but isn't as gregarious as more familiar spaniels like Springers and Brittanys.

  • Hailing from Turkey, the Anatolian Shepherd Dog was bred to guard livestock. The breed is not well-known outside of his native land, except to fanciers. Guarding instincts are highly developed and can be misplaced if owners are not aware of this.

  • A cat that is not wanting to eat or is not eating, is a cat who has a potentially life-threatening medical condition. Many conditions can lead to the inability of your cat to eat or for your cat to lose her appetite completely. It is important to find the underlying cause so that an appropriate treatment plan can be created. Appetite stimulants may be prescribed and in some cases a feeding tube may be placed by your veterinarian. Decreased food intake or any change in eating habits warrants investigation by your veterinarian.